Alexander Technique

“Change involves carrying out an activity against the habit of live”
– F.M. Alexander

Alexander Technique is a way of becoming more aware of balance, posture and movement in daily life. This can bring into consciousness tension previously unnoticed, and helps us differentiate between necessary and unnecessary (appropriate and inappropriate) tensions and effort.

The body mechanisms of support and balance can be seen working beautifully in most small children, but they are very delicate mechanisms and are easily interfered with. The emotional and physical strains accumalated through life can soon become fixed into the body in the form of chronic muscle tensions and patterns of distortion throughout the physical structure. With the Alexander Technique you are able to increase your awarness of the connection between your movement patterns, your thoughts about these movements, and your visual impressions. In this way, you develop a clearer understanding of how your mind/body operates and a greater appreciation of the involvement of your thought process in all your physical acts.

The Technique is popularly supposed to be concerned with posture and relaxation; two subjects that are not normally associated together. These days, relaxation is widely recognised as desirable, but is fast becoming something that one “does” at certain specific times set aside for the purpose, purhaps by diverting the mind on pleasant topics, or by adopting certain postures and trying to relax all the muscles of the body, or by employing meditative techniques from Eastern religions. “Good posture” is also often recognised as desirable, but is usually regarded as only attainable with considerable willpower and strain, and so efforts towards it are soon abandoned.

The Alexander Technique helps you use the appropriate amount of effort for a particular activity, giving you more energy. In the process, your kinesthetic sense becomes a more accurate guide so that you can take on new activities, as well as old ones, with greater ease and freedom.

After a series of lessons, you are able to increase your awareness of the connection between your movement patterns, your thoughts about these movements, and your visual impressions. In this way, you develop a clearer understanding of how your mind/body operates and a greater appreciation of the involvement of your thought process in all your physical acts. Becoming aware of and changing the habits that interfere with these simple activities builds a foundation for tackling more complex problems.